englishprof
Woolf often conceives of life this way: as a gift that you’ve been given, which you must hold onto and treasure but never open. Opening it would dispel the atmosphere, ruin the radiance—and the radiance of life is what makes it worth living. It’s hard to say just what holding onto life without looking at it might mean; that’s one of the puzzles of her books. But it has something to do with preserving life’s mystery; with leaving certain things undescribed, unspecified, and unknown; with savoring certain emotions, such as curiosity, surprise, desire, and anticipation. It depends on an intensified sense of life’s preciousness and fragility, and on a Heisenberg-like notion that, when it comes to our most abstract and spiritual intuitions, looking too closely changes what we feel. It has to do, in other words, with a kind of inner privacy, by means of which you shield yourself not just from others’ prying eyes, but from your own. Call it an artist’s sense of privacy.
Joshua Rothman, “Virginia Woolf’s Idea of Privacy” (via englishprof)
onlyslightly

deviantfemme:

I want support for ugly girls and lazy girls and girls that can’t ever get their eyeliner right. I want feminism that includes girls who are too big or too black to be on body positive blogs.

I want girls with acne scars and girls who don’t “pass” and girls with facial hair….

magicalrocketships

allthingslinguistic:

"The man to my right started telling me about all the ways that the internet is degrading the English language. He brought up Facebook and he said: "to defriend, I mean is that a real word?”. I wanna pause on that question: what makes a word ‘real’?”- Anne Curzan, What makes a word “real”? TEDxUofM [x]

The whole TEDx talk that this is from is very much worth the watch. 

Go Blue!